February 12, 2002

Slobo-Nostalgia in the L.A. Times:

Slobo-Nostalgia in the L.A. Times: My hometown paper publishes a noxious op-ed today from Marko Lopusina and Andre Huzsvai, where poor Slobodan Milosevic is described as "a scapegoat in a show trial with a predestined outcome." Here's the loopy nut graf, notable for its insight into the fevers of people who blame the U.S. for absolutely everything.

Were allegations of Milosevic's "war crimes" in Bosnia and Croatia true, he would have been indicted in 1995, instead of rubbing elbows with U.S. politicos at the Dayton peace talks. Were Washington serious about toppling him, it could have done so in 1996 by supporting the Serb opposition movement, Zajedno. Yet the U.S. seems to have been more interested in keeping Milosevic in power until the last part of the Pax Americana scenario in the Balkans played out with the NATO occupation of Kosovo.
Milosevic wasn't indicted in 1995, because the U.S. needed him to negotiate Dayton. He wasn't arrested at Dayton, because it's considered bad manners to arrest foreign presidents just after they've negotiated peace deals. If Washington was as "serious about toppling" Milosevice in 1996 – which could have only been done by invading a country which was then not at war – the authors would have been the first to condemn the action as an illegal and imperialist intervention. The U.S. did support the opposition movement Zajedno, but not to the point of giving it guns, or somehow enforcing the elections Slobo was busy ignoring. By "the last part of the Pax Americana scenario in the Balkans," I assume the authors are referring to "democratic elections in Serbia," which is what led to Milosevic being arrested and charged.

Huszvai is no stranger to Slobo apologia. Last year, he signed a petition called Stop the Witch Hunt Against Slobodan Milosevic, which included the following howlers:

Milosevic the so-called "ethnic cleanser" preached multinational unity, not nationalist intolerance. ... The effort to prosecute Milosevic is an attack on all who support multinational unity.
and
Crimes were committed in Yugoslavia - but not by Milosevic. They were committed by American and NATO leaders who authorized a low-grade nuclear war that specifically targeted civilians and left huge portions of the country contaminated for the next 4.5 billion years.
and
Slobodan Milosevic's real offense was that he tried to keep the 26 nationalities that comprise Yugoslavia free from US and NATO colonization and occupation; his nation's resources, industries, and media from being stolen by multinational corporations; his nation's institutions from being controlled by US consultants and advisers. His real offense was to defend his nation's freedom and sovereignty from a political "opposition" bought and paid for by the United States and insta by US specialists in psychological operations. He and all those now under attack resisted Western colonization to the very end.
and
As the experience in Russia and the rest of Eastern Europe has shown, bowing to Western pressure will never improve living standards; and imposing political repression will only leave deep and long lasting scars on the national psyche.
I remember the difference between Yugoslavia and Czechoslovakia in 1990 – living standards were so much better in Yugoslavia it wasn't even funny. Skopje, considered a backwater today, was leagues ahead of now-fashionable Prague. By 1996, when I visited Belgrade to cover the student protests, the Czechs, Hungarians, Slovaks and Slovenes had "improved" to such a degree that the thousands of Yugo refugees in Budapest and elsewhere were reduced to nostalgia for the 1980s, when they would feel like kings visiting their poor Warsaw Pact cousins. In today's piece, which does have a few valid points (the trial will hopefully bring out the truth, the Balkans are complicated, Croats and Muslims did bad stuff too, the KLA is scary, and the international community has frequently bungled its interventions), the authors seal their ignomy by using scare-quotes around "war crimes," "rape camps" and "concentration camps," calling them all "myths." That will be news to the half-dozen friends I know who have seen and documented all of the above. Surely the L.A. Times can find critics of the Milosevic trial, and of U.S. intervention in the Balkans, who don't resort to grotesque denial.

Posted by at February 12, 2002 09:05 AM
Comments
Post a comment









Remember personal info?






rican and NATO leaders who authorized a low-grade nuclear war that specifically targeted civilians and left huge portions of the country contaminated for the next 4.5 billion years.and
Slobodan Milosevic's real offense was that he tried to keep the 26 nationalities that comprise Yugoslavia free from US and NATO colonization and occupation; his nation's resources, industries, and media from being stolen by multinational corporations; his nation's institutions from being controlled by US consultants and advisers. His real offense was to defend his nation's freedom and sovereignty from a political "opposition" bought and paid for by the United States and installed into power by US specialists in psychological operations. He and all those now under attack resisted Western colonization to the very end.
and
As the experience in Russia and the rest of Eastern Europe has shown, bowing to Western pressure will never improve living standards; and imposing political repression will only leave deep and long lasting scars on the national psyche.
I remember the difference between Yugoslavia and Czechoslovakia in 1990 – living standards were so much better in Yugoslavia it wasn't even funny. Skopje, considered a backwater today, was leagues ahead of now-fashionable Prague. By 1996, when I visited Belgrade to cover the student protests, the Czechs, Hungarians, Slovaks and Slovenes had "improved" to such a degree that the thousands of Yugo refugees in Budapest and elsewhere were reduced to nostalgia for the 1980s, when they would feel like kings visiting their poor Warsaw Pact cousins. In today's piece, which does have a few valid points (the trial will hopefully bring out the truth, the Balkans are complicated, Croats and Muslims did bad stuff too, the KLA is scary, and the international community has frequently bungled its interventions), the authors seal their ignomy by using scare-quotes around "war crimes," "rape camps" and "concentration camps," calling them all "myths." That will be news to the half-dozen friends I know who have seen and documented all of the above. Surely the L.A. Times can find critics of the Milosevic trial, and of U.S. intervention in the Balkans, who don't resort to grotesque denial.

Posted by at February 12, 2002 09:05 AM
Comments
Post a comment









Remember personal info?






= true; } else { document.comments_form.bakecookie[1].checked = true; } //--> /body>