September 01, 2003

Guess I'm Essentially Screw...

Guess I'm Essentially Screwed! From a news article in today's L.A. Times:

A college degree essentially has become a prerequisite for professional and financial success.

Posted by at September 1, 2003 10:28 AM
Comments
Guess I'm Essentially Screw...

Guess I'm Essentially Screwed! From a news article in today's L.A. Times:

A college degree essentially has become a prerequisite for professional and financial success.

Posted by at September 1, 2003 10:28 AM
Comments

You and me both, buddy.

Posted by: Howard Owens at September 1, 2003 10:41 AM

A Big Ten university is where my immortal soul died. Here are my two favorite (snarky) links about academe. Try them, they're fun:

http://www.pastornet.net.au/jmm/abfr/abfr0169.htm

http://www.cato.org/pubs/policy_report/cpr-20n1-1.html

That being said, we see that time and again, immigrants and others with absolutely nothing going on in their lives are brought to wealth and strength in the community through higher education. The reason we read Welch is that he's verbally adept and gifted with a disciplined mind. Most of us on the planet aren't blessed with those treasures... We need to have them beaten into us.

I grew up on a college campus and am eager to ridicule the tenured, technocratic, elbow-patched fuckwad professor at the slightest provocation. But a lot of people need college degrees, and the discipline they portend, very badly.

Posted by: Cridland at September 1, 2003 01:40 PM

And the reason why college degrees have become essential?

Because nearly forty years of "progressive" public education have made a high school diploma meaningless.

Posted by: Rex-Pat at September 1, 2003 01:58 PM

Obviously, you managed to learn a thing or two -- most importantly, how to think for yourself -- without anyone standing over you cracking a whip. And to think you missed out of wymyn's studies, and other such valuable collegiate offerings. Some might call you lacking in a college degree. Others might just call you...smart and lucky.

Posted by: Amy Alkon at September 1, 2003 02:57 PM

Y'all are nice. I *did*, however, last in college long enough to take a Chicano Studies class at UC Santa Barbara. Wish I remembered it more, considering the current MEChA flap. All I really recall from it was that A) it was my least favorite college course, save for Chemistry, despite my strong interest in the subject; and B) I failed it, like I failed every other class that quarter....

Posted by: Matt Welch at September 1, 2003 04:19 PM

Harry Truman never even attended college. Neither did Mike Tyson, Bob Dylan, or Gwyneth Paltrow.

Posted by: Steve Smith at September 1, 2003 04:54 PM

I'd start my own blog if I could get Amy Alkon to comment from time to time. And I could sure give her a lot to comment on.

Posted by: Rex-Pat at September 1, 2003 06:55 PM

Yes, David Geffen is just gnashing his teeth, regretting not having a degree from CalState LA. Boy, think about what his life could be like if he had a BA!

Posted by: Kate at September 2, 2003 07:43 AM

I messed up during my senior year of college, I've been working in the three years since and now I'm going back to finish my two last classes (while still keeping the job).

I agree with Cridland that some people need that piece of paper. Matt, you seem to get along fine without it. I'm not so sure I could.

But the irony is that, except for a few classes, I didn't learn anything particularly profound in college, and I did a decent job of balancing studying with partying. So it's just a formality, I guess. Then again, anything that helps boost my paycheck is something I'll welcome.

Posted by: Nik at September 2, 2003 04:57 PM

When discussing financial failures, you shouldn't forget Bill Gates, who dropped out of Harvard.

Posted by: Jim Miller at September 4, 2003 03:51 PM

Having a college degree helps if you get a degree in the right are and also if you're in good condition. I should know. I have both a BA & a MA in History, but employers don't care for historians and won't hire them for just about anything, including museum work. If you want to both get a college education and wind up on the unemployment line for anything but unskilled labor jobs that you could have gotten if you had simply dropped out of High School, then History along with most other Liberal Arts majors is your way to go. As for the "good condition" part, I have some other problems in life dating from early childhood that, shall we say, interfere with my ability to get the job done. In other words, both a good education in the right subjects and a good medical condition are both good ways to wind up on the path to success.

Posted by: Charles Rector at September 5, 2003 10:03 PM
Post a comment









Remember personal info?






at September 1, 2003 06:55 PM

Yes, David Geffen is just gnashing his teeth, regretting not having a degree from CalState LA. Boy, think about what his life could be like if he had a BA!

Posted by: Kate at September 2, 2003 07:43 AM

I messed up during my senior year of college, I've been working in the three years since and now I'm going back to finish my two last classes (while still keeping the job).

I agree with Cridland that some people need that piece of paper. Matt, you seem to get along fine without it. I'm not so sure I could.

But the irony is that, except for a few classes, I didn't learn anything particularly profound in college, and I did a decent job of balancing studying with partying. So it's just a formality, I guess. Then again, anything that helps boost my paycheck is something I'll welcome.

Posted by: Nik at September 2, 2003 04:57 PM

When discussing financial failures, you shouldn't forget Bill Gates, who dropped out of Harvard.

Posted by: Jim Miller at September 4, 2003 03:51 PM

Having a college degree helps if you get a degree in the right are and also if you're in good condition. I should know. I have both a BA & a MA in History, but employers don't care for historians and won't hire them for just about anything, including museum work. If you want to both get a college education and wind up on the unemployment line for anything but unskilled labor jobs that you could have gotten if you had simply dropped out of High School, then History along with most other Liberal Arts majors is your way to go. As for the "good condition" part, I have some other problems in life dating from early childhood that, shall we say, interfere with my ability to get the job done. In other words, both a good education in the right subjects and a good medical condition are both good ways to wind up on the path to success.

Posted by: Charles Rector at September 5, 2003 10:03 PM
Post a comment









Remember personal info?






= true; } else { document.comments_form.bakecookie[1].checked = true; } //--> /body> e { document.comments_form.bakecookie[1].checked = true; } //--> /body>