March 27, 2003

Speaking of Tough L.A. Jour...

Speaking of Tough L.A. Journalists....: Jill Stewart has a Posted by at March 27, 2003 10:30 PM

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Ya know, I like what RJ Smith does, but he's a bit of a pussy, isn't he?

Why make these softball-goofball jabs at Jill when you know they won't stick, and don't even make sense?

Ah, all press is good press, etc., and Stewart looks lovely in the photo.

Posted by: Ken Layne at March 27, 2003 10:57 PM

Yeah, I really didn't get the whole "she doesn't come clean" bit. And he didn't seem too alarmed by his conclusion that one couldn't imagine a daily hiring her. Doesn't that say something pathetic about dailies -- that they can't imagine a place for the only L.A. columnist in a decade (or three) to actually get people excited about local politics & governance, on account that she has the bad manners to use words like "rat" and "weenie"?

But, whatever. I know *I* won't be looking that good at 48....

Posted by: Matt Welch at March 27, 2003 11:04 PM

"But, whatever. I know *I* won't be looking that good at 48...."

I read that and assumed it was a misprint until I double checked it. I remember first seeing her on KCET's "Life and Times" about five years ago and assuming without thinking about it that she was about thirty (and also remember thinking that she reminded me of a brighter, more witty Nicole Kidman). I've been an admirer of her writing for quite a while, though I haven't read much of her stuff since I moved to Oregon in June of 2001. Keep after 'em, Jill: you've got plenty of people in your corner.

As for R.J. Smith, he can go join Eric Alterman in the sore losers corner.

Posted by: M. Scott Eiland at March 28, 2003 02:36 AM

This part cracked me up:

"Still, her philosophy is a bizarre one, especially for a political reporter—that those who practice politics are automatically suspect. It is the essence of her political naïveté that those who do things like lobby, haggle, get out the vote, and raise money are thought to be inherently evil for doing them. Thus the methods of politics are sullied, and those who practice them de facto creeps."

I wouldn't trust any political reporter who didn't think that. Reminds of one of my favorite P.J. O'Rourke-isms: "Politics is the business of getting power and privilege without possessing merit."

I follow politics, but I realize it's a sick, unhealthy obsession, a window on the lowest and most hilarious forms of depravity, like watching "Cops." I already don't entirely trust myself because of that interest -- I'd never completely trust someone who actually practices politics.

Posted by: Tony Biasotti at March 28, 2003 12:38 PM
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Yeah, I really didn't get the whole "she doesn't come clean" bit. And he didn't seem too alarmed by his conclusion that one couldn't imagine a daily hiring her. Doesn't that say something pathetic about dailies -- that they can't imagine a place for the only L.A. columnist in a decade (or three) to actually get people excited about local politics & governance, on account that she has the bad manners to use words like "rat" and "weenie"?

But, whatever. I know *I* won't be looking that good at 48....

Posted by: Matt Welch at March 27, 2003 11:04 PM

"But, whatever. I know *I* won't be looking that good at 48...."

I read that and assumed it was a misprint until I double checked it. I remember first seeing her on KCET's "Life and Times" about five years ago and assuming without thinking about it that she was about thirty (and also remember thinking that she reminded me of a brighter, more witty Nicole Kidman). I've been an admirer of her writing for quite a while, though I haven't read much of her stuff since I moved to Oregon in June of 2001. Keep after 'em, Jill: you've got plenty of people in your corner.

As for R.J. Smith, he can go join Eric Alterman in the sore losers corner.

Posted by: M. Scott Eiland at March 28, 2003 02:36 AM

This part cracked me up:

"Still, her philosophy is a bizarre one, especially for a political reporter—that those who practice politics are automatically suspect. It is the essence of her political naïveté that those who do things like lobby, haggle, get out the vote, and raise money are thought to be inherently evil for doing treporter who didn't think that. Reminds of one of my favorite P.J. O'Rourke-isms: "Politics is the business of getting power and privilege without possessing merit."

I follow politics, but I realize it's a sick, unhealthy obsession, a window on the lowest and most hilarious forms of depravity, like watching "Cops." I already don't entirely trust myself because of that interest -- I'd never completely trust someone who actually practices politics.

Posted by: Tony Biasotti at March 28, 2003 12:38 PM
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