October 09, 2002

Notes on the Game: You know...

Notes on the Game: You know that filthy, tailing 86-mph change-up that Troy Percival threw to strike out Bobby Kielty looking with runne the ninth.

Interesting managerial moves. Worst one of the game? Gardenhire leaving in the tiring Rick Reed in the sixth to face a hot-hitting Brad Fullmer just after Troy Glaus smashed a triple to right. Minnesota has a terrific bullpen, stocked with well-rested left-handers who can strike people out (such as that Santana kid, who would end up replacing Reed), and Fullmer can't hit lefties. Fullmer hit a two-run home run, giving the Angels what turned out to be an insurmountable 6-0 lead. It also wasn't too brilliant to put Luis Rivas in a position to get picked off first base down by four runs in the third inning.

I didn't understand at all why we brought in Orlando Palmeiro to replace the injured Tim Salmon. You're up four runs, you want defense, and you have an outfielder on your bench (Alex Ochoa), who runs well and has a cannon, as opposed to Palmeiro, who is skinny but not fast, and throws about like me. Plus, Minnesota's bullpen is filled with left-handers. ... It didn't have much impact. Also, I was a little sketchy at first about Scioscia bringing Percy in with an out to go in the 8th (if it was up to me, Franky Rodriguez would pitch the entire game, just for fun), but it made sense given how rested Percival was. Plus, it worked.

Best managerial move of the game? Scioscia starting Ramon Ortiz. The L.A. beat writers thought it would be better to start John Lackey, since Ramon was so excitable against the Yankees, and figured to get rattled in the Hanky-dome. Scioscia starting him did exactly what Scioscia pitching Weber last night did, and what Scioscia pitching Donnelly the day after he gave up the Bernie Williams homer did -- it was a vote of confidence, and now that a confidence-backed player has responded by succeeding, he will be in a better position to succeed later in the playoffs. It wouldn't have taken much to have Weber, Donnelly and Ortiz all too rattled to contribute anymore, and now they're all feeling good, and the Angels have the home-field advantage. Not bad at all ...

Finally, Spiezio played defense tonight like he has all year. He was a bit tight against the Yanks. Hoo-ray!!

Posted by at October 9, 2002 09:07 PM
Comments

Since we won the game, we have no problem admitting that the change up El Toro threw to end the game was pretty much a 'ball'.

Posted by: In Arguendo at October 10, 2002 10:45 AM

Filthy is right, as long as by filthy you mean it was so clearly not a strike.

Posted by: Chris at October 10, 2002 01:21 PM

Dude had a weird strike zone, that's for sure.

Posted by: Matt Welch at October 10, 2002 01:38 PM

A little side note-according to Press-Enterprise columnist Lyle Spencer, (who you should read if you have a chance) Bobby Kielty's dad taught Percival algebra in Moreno Valley back in the eighties. Dad also bought some scalped tickets to the big A so Bobby could watch Henderson send Angels into their death spiral.

Posted by: Lloyd at October 11, 2002 09:28 AM
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se given how rested Percival was. Plus, it worked.

Best managerial move of the game? Scioscia starting Ramon Ortiz. The L.A. beat writers thought it would be better to start John Lackey, since Ramon was so excitable against the Yankees, and figured to get rattled in the Hanky-dome. Scioscia starting him did exactly what Scioscia pitching Weber last night did, and what Scioscia pitching Donnelly the day after he gave up the Bernie Williams homer did -- it was a vote of confidence, and now that a confidence-backed player has responded by succeeding, he will be in a better position to succeed later in the playoffs. It wouldn't have taken much to have Weber, Donnelly and Ortiz all too rattled to contribute anymore, and now they're all feeling good, and the Angels have the home-field advantage. Not bad at all ...

Finally, Spiezio played defense tonight like he has all year. He was a bit tight against the Yanks. Hoo-ray!!

Posted by at October 9, 2002 09:07 PM
Comments

Since we won the game, we have no problem admitting that the change up El Toro threw to end the game was pretty much a 'ball'.

Posted by: In Arguendo at October 10, 2002 10:45 AM

Filthy is right, as long as by filthy you mean it was so clearly not a strike.

Posted by: Chris at October 10, 2002 01:21 PM

Dude had a weird strike zone, that's for sure.

Posted by: Matt Welch at October 10, 2002 01:38 PM

A little side note-according to Press-Enterprise columnist Lyle Spencer, (who you should read if you have a chance) Bobby Kielty's dad taught Percival algebra in Moreno Valley back in the eighties. Dad also bought some scalped tickets to the big A so Bobby could watch Henderson send Angels into their death spiral.

Posted by: Lloyd at October 11, 2002 09:28 AM
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